PELTON

Situated a short distance up the line from Stella Gill on the way to Beamish, Pelton Station served the villages of both Pelton and Pelton Fell (the station was actually closer to Pelton Fell than to Pelton) with the passenger service commencing on 1 February 1894 and ending on 23 May 1955.

Site of Pelton Station 1945

Site of Pelton Station in 1945 from Google Earth

Typical of the stations on the line, the buildings were timber with, as can be seen in the two older photographs of  the station, the main station building on the up side in the direction of South Pelaw with a signal box and smaller waiting shelter positioned on the platform on the down side towards Consett.  All the buildings were painted in the standard NER green/cream livery.

peltonstation

Pelton Station showing the signal box and buildings on the Consett bound platform from an 1897 postcard. Courtesy Pelton Fell History Group

In the early years in particular, Pelton was a busy station with 45,614 passengers booked in 1898, 63,706 in 1903 and 78,316 in 1913.  However, like all the stations on the line, the number of passengers began to fall dramatically in the early 1920s with the introduction of local bus services and worse was to follow come the 1930s.

The goods yard, consisting of three sidings and a small goods shed, was on the up side of the line behind the main station buildings accessed via a narrow road, still there to this day, from Station Lane (called Marley Lane prior to the building of the station).

railway_pelton-railway-station

Pelton station looking in the direction of Stella Gill. Courtesy of Pelton Fell History Group

Pelton station handled 6,027 tonnes of brick from Consett in 1906 and 3,989 tons in 1907 and, whilst livestock was of little significance on the line, the station handled 2,334 head of livestock in 1907.  Goods traffic at the station in 1899 (excluding livestock and minerals such as coal, coke, limestone and lime) consisted of 6,335 tons forwarded and 42,967 tonnes received.

Pelton in the 1950s…

Q7 63473 at Pelton with Iron Ore Emptys heading towards South Pelaw sometime in the 1950s. Photo Author's Collection

Q7 63473 at Pelton with Iron Ore empties heading towards South Pelaw sometime in the latter half of the 1950s as the station appears to be closed. Photo Author’s Collection

 

J27 65871 passes Pelton with a brake van on 13/08/1956. The loco is heading towards South Pelaw with the site of Pelton Station in the background. Photo copyright Rail-Online

Pelton in the 1960s…

92064 at Pelton in the 1960s with a loaded ore train for Consett. Photo Robin Barbour Collection

92064 at Pelton in the 1960s with a loaded ore train for Consett. Photo Robin Barbour Collection

Type 4 (later Class 40) D392 banking a 9F hauled iron ore train at Beamish on 24 April 1965.

Type 4 (later Class 40) D392 banking a 9F hauled iron ore train at Pelton on 24 April 1965.  Holy Trinity Church is just off to the left – if you were standing at the same location today, the Vicarage would be right in front of you.  Photo copyright Rail-Online

The same location as the photo above it is was on 25/12/2016. Photo Author’s Collection

Trespass warning sign at Pelton. Photo Author's Collection

Trespass warning sign at Pelton. Photo Author’s Collection

Pelton in the 1970s…

37062 on the County Durham Crusader at Pelton (12 May 1979) Alan Lewis

37062 passes the site of Pelton Station on the County Durham Crusader railtour on 12 May 1979. Photo Copyright Alan Lewis

37242 Pelton 1977, coal train

37242 passes through Pelton with a coal train in 1977. Photo copyright Stephen McGahon.

37108 passes Pelton with the 6T10 on 21 November 1979. Photo Copyright John Atkinson

37108 passes Pelton with the 6T10 on 21 November 1979. Photo Copyright John Atkinson

After Closure…

The following four photos from Paul Loynes show the bridge at Pelton and the track bed in the summer of 1986.

The Site Today…

Site of Pelton Station

Site of Pelton Station from Google Earth

Whilst the flat area that was once the small goods yard remains, there is nothing else to suggest that there was ever a station there now.

The following two photographs show the sites of the station and the goods yard in April 2014:

Site of Pelton Railway Station

Site of Pelton Station. Photo copyright John Donnelly

Site of Pelton Goods Yard

Site of Pelton Goods Yard. The gate in the left background is the entrance to the station yard from Station Lane. Photo copyright John Donnelly

At the end of the station site towards South Pelaw stands another of the art installations on the line, King Coal by artist David Kemp.

This was built of stone from the dismantled Consett railway station bridge and bricks from old kilns, while British Coal provided the crown. It was put together by a stonemason and local volunteers and was, by sheer coincidence, finished on October 15 1992 – the very day of the announcement of the closure of the last pits in Durham’s once booming coalfields.

King Coal

King Coal. Photo copyright John Donnelly

The photos below show the bridge that carried the Pelton Lane Ends road over the line.  Much like the road bridge at South Pelaw junction, this one was a plate girder bridge as shown in the photo below during the lifting of the track which has subsequently had the road deck rebuilt and the span below filled in:

Pelton to Ouston 13 October 1985 004

37194 at the site of Pelton Station on 13 October 1985 during the track lifting.  Note how little clearance there is between the roof of the locomotive and the underside of the bridge. Photo Authors Collection

Road bridge at Pelton Lane Ends 1

Photo Copyright John Donnelly

Road bridge at Pelton Lane Ends 2

Photo Copyright John Donnelly

Road bridge at Pelton Lane Ends 3

Photo Copyright John Donnelly

7 thoughts on “PELTON

  1. John Donnelly Post author

    It was captioned as having been taken at Pelton but I’ve been advised that it is in Stanley and comparison with one of the photos I have of the last passenger train confirms this so I’ve moved the photo to the Stanley page.

  2. david willoughby

    Cant believe the photo of the 40 banking the 9f at Pelton Bridge,I pass this location every day whilst driving my bus and imagine what it must of looked like without the trees, they are just taking over our planet.Brilliant image.

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